Exploring LGBTQ Stories and Histories

Thu. March 19, 2:00 PM - 3:30 PM

Central JMRL Library

201 E Market Street, Charlottesville, VA 22902

Sponsored by: CFA Institute, Charlottesville Pride Community Network

Hosted by: The Department of Women, Gender & Sexuality at UVA and UVA LGBT Committee for Faculty and Staff

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Authors Julie Koets (The Rib Joint), Jeff Mann (LGBTQ Fiction and Poetry from Appalachia), James Polchin (Indecent Advances: A Hidden History of True Crime and Prejudice Before Stonewall) will discuss their recent books—memoir, fiction, poetry, and nonfiction—sharing stories of LGBTQ lives, including the complex balances found between Southern and queer identities, and uncovered histories of gay lives lived in secret and lost to violence. Book sales and signing will follow. FREE to attend and open to the public.

Why should you attend?

“I grew up in the church,” writes Julia Koets, “the way some people grow up in a neighborhood.” And around that sentence, The Rib Joint examines what it means to live inside a structure that both feeds and starves you at once—especially if you’re queer. With radical intuition, Koets thinks about the price of secrets, implying at every turn that love and lies can’t share the same space. A brilliant, unsettling book. —Paul Lisicky, author of The Narrow Door: A Memoir of Friendship

“This collection [LGBTQ Fiction and Poetry from Appalachia], through its poetry and prose, maps the queer ecology of Appalachia and the voices that construct themselves in relation to the landscape and the cultural imagination of the place. Each piece in the book unfolds as paradox of both belonging (being from and of a place) and nearly complete alienation.” —Stacey Waite, author of Teaching Queer

“James Polchin has written an important book about a critical chapter of LGBT history, carefully documenting the victimization and discrimination that gay men suffered before Stonewall. Much has changed, but discrimination and hate crimes still go on, and there are still many battles left to fight and win. The stories in this book are often heartbreaking and brutal, but the larger story of oppression needed to be told.” —Bill Burton, The Gay & Lesbian Review/Worldwide